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    OUTREACH ACTIVITIES      
   
CRIMT's outreach activities (or those to which it contributes) aim at knowledge transfer and are developed in close collaboration with labour market actors. Favouring the co-construction of knowledge, these activities seek to respond to the needs of social partners, to increase the skills and capacity for decision-making and innovation in organizations, to identify new avenues of research and intervention, to encourage sharing of know-how between knowledge producers and users and to contribute to the development and evaluation of public policies. Note that, in addition to the many activities CRIMT and its partners organize, coresearchers are regularly asked to sit on expert committees, provide training and give lectures at the request of labour market actors.
 
           
    2012      
         
    14-15 June 2012 • International Conference

Reconciling Company Productivity and the Protection of Employee Health, Safety and Dignity: Innovative Solutions in France and Quebec

Université Laval
Pavillon Alphonse-Desjardins

The Interuniversity research centre on globalization and work (CRIMT), the Faculty of Law at Université Laval, Université Lille 2, the Chair in Occupational Health and Safety Management (CGSST), the Centre de recherche Droit et Perspectives du droit (CRPD) and the Équipe de recherches en droit social (LEREDS) held an international conference on company productivity and the protection of employee health, safety and dignity.

In recent years, the rise in fundamental human rights has brought about a new rationality, based on higher values, to which the state and workplace actors are subject. Protection against discrimination, the right to dignity, the right to a private life, now form part of legislation, public policy and business decision-making. This phenomenon of ‘constitutionalization’, which can be observed in both Quebec and France, causes effects that directly impact upon all institutions in the world of work, but, above all, it acts as a counterbalance to the multiple changes that are characterizing work organization and the composition of the workforce. In fact, this predominance of fundamental rights has encouraged a certain amount of redeployment of labour law in a direction which is inclined more towards the protection of worker health and dignity. This is a significant step at a time when work-related public policy has increasingly less control over economic reality.

What are the respective solutions introduced in France and Quebec to deal with these issues? Research highlights the need to reconcile an employee’s fundamental rights with employer power, the latter having authority and organizational capacity asserted by labour law. Among the various issues, three were of particular interest for the purposes of this international conference, because they generate significant litigation in Quebec and France: 1) employee monitoring: the boundaries between a professional and private life, 2) Work and mental health: the rights and obligations of the employer and the employee, 3) sub-contracting and tripartite relations: impacts upon the protection of employee health, safety and dignity.

The conference did consist of short presentations by researchers and practitioners, followed by a round table discussion on each of these themes. This conference was a follow up to a first symposium held at Lille (France) in June 2009 that focused on redeployment obligations under French law and the accommodation of disabled employees under Quebec law. The success of this event, which attracted almost 350 participants with legal, union, employer, political and health system backgrounds, confirmed the relevance of continuing this Legal/Health/Work-based research in a multidisciplinary manner and through a fresh lens, looking at France and Quebec
.

SSHRC-MCRI Project(s) : 3.3

Promotional Material

Poster
Symposium website (French)

  Laflamme  
   
 
         
    12 April 2012 • Workshop

La négociation au travail, le travail de la négociation

University of Montreal
Montreal, Canada
  pie  
         
    2010
     
           
    23-24 September 2010 • International Conference

Union Action Without Borders

HEC Montréal
Montreal, Canada

On September 23rd and 24th 2010, CRIMT held in Montreal an international conference on Union Action Without Borders
. Organized in collaboration with the CISO, the CSQ, the CSN and the FTQ, its purpose was to assess the different initiatives undertaken by labour unions at various levels, be it local, national and international. About 50 guest speakers and labour leaders from Canada and abroad shared their experience on that occasion.

Since the lauch of the first cooperation and humanitarian programs, such initiatives have greatly evolved. Several union networks now exist and new tools are being created, such as international framework agreements, shareholder engagement, and responsible purchasing policies. While these international actions are challenged, they convey great expectations, as an increasing number of unions are involved in building international ties to promote and defend workers' interests.

This important conference tackled a variety of contemporary issues: What are the tools and resources available to unions? How can a dialogue be built between northern and southern countries? How can workers' awareness we enhanced with regards to international trade unionism? How can these actions improve the life of workers, both in Canada and abroad?


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): 4.3.2

Promotional Material


Conference Website
Poster

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Edited volume (in preparation)
SpacerRevue Perspectives (CSN), January 2011, No. 32

Post-Conference Website
Media Library

  ASSF  
   
 
         
    23 June 2010 • International Seminar

Multinationals and Employment

Salon Domo Hotel Lucerna
Tijuana, Mexico

Global economic competition and the related restructuring of most contemporary workplaces present huge challenges for our understanding of the world of work in the current phase of globalization. Multinational Corporations (MNCs) are at the forefront of the movement of capital, productive capacity and know-how and jobs across borders and within international supply chains. The analysis of their behaviour is critical to the understanding of the dynamics of management and business in developed and developing economies. The methodological challenge is daunting: how to capture key trends in the management of multinational firms and understand these trends relative to the institutional and organizational characteristics of these firms in comparative contextual context?

This particular seminar was the third in a series aimed at bringing together CRIMT coresearchers (part of the INTREPID Network and of subproject 1.1) and business and labour leaders concerned with the redeployment of multinational companies. In this case from the US-Mexico cross-border region.

SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): 1.1

Promotional Material


Program

   
   
 
           
    16-18 June 2010 • International Conference

Employee Representation in the New World of Work. The Dynamics of Rights, Voice, Performance and Power

Université Laval
Quebec, Canada

The era of globalization and new information technologies has brought about significant changes in workplace configuration, workforce composition and expectations, and in the management of human resources as firms seek competitive advantage in an increasingly competitive environment. These changes pose considerable challenges to the traditional notions of employee representation, the core tenets of which were inspired in Canada under the Wagner Act exactly 75 years ago. The nature of these challengeswere fully explored and debated at an international conference that was held at the Université Laval (Quebec, Canada),on June 16th, 17th and 18th 2010.

This conference was the result of a special collaboration between the Interuniversity Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT) and the Canadian Industrial Relations Association (CIRA). Part of CRIMT's Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada's (SSHRC) Major Collaborative Research Initiatives (MCRI) project Building Institutions and Capabilities for Work and Employment in a Global Era: The Social Dynamics of Labour Regulation, it focused on a number of key issues relating to employee representation in the new world of work, including: the relevance in today's workplace of the founding principles of different representative systems; how different types of employee representation regimes deal with issues facing the contemporary worker; the emerging models and actors for employee rights and representation; the kinds of public policy, actors, strategies, capabilities and research that are necessary to rethink employee representation in the contemporary workplacel.

Four round-tables organized in collaboration with labour market partners were held during the conference. Three out of four (2nd, 3rd and 4th respectively) can be watched by clicking the thumbnails on the right or by visiting the Media Library.

1. Assessing the Labour Relations Framework

Chair:
Gilles Trudeau (University of Montreal)

Michel Arsenault (President, Fédération des travailleurs et travailleuses du Québec - FTQ), Me Brian W. Burkett (Partner, Heenan Blaikie), Claudette Carbonneau (President, Confédération des syndicats nationaux - CSN), Anthony Giles (Director General, Strategic Policy, Analysis and Workplace, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada), Roger Lecourt (Former Labour Deputy Minister, Government of Quebec / Consultant with the International Labour Organization), Me Jeffrey Sack (Partner, Sack Goldblatt Mitchell)

2. The Economic Crisis in the Public Services and Sector: Future Perspectives for Collective Representation

Chair:
Martine D'Amours (Université Laval)

Louis Roy (First Vice-president, Confédération des syndicats nationaux - CSN), Lucie Martineau (President General, Syndicat de la fonction publique du Québec - SFPQ), Réjean Parent (President, Centrale des syndicats du Québec - CSQ), Dominique Verreault (President, Alliance du personnel professionnel et technique de la santé et des services sociaux - APTS), Régine Laurent (President, Fédération interprofessionnelle de la santé du Québec - FIQ)

3. The Future of Employee Representation at Walmart

Chair:
Gregor Murray (University of Montreal)

Nelson Lichtenstein (University of California at Santa Barbara), Louis Bolduc (Quebec Assistant to the Canadian Director, United Food and Commercial Workers, and Vice-President of the QFL), Me Claude Leblanc (Philion Leblanc Beaudry), Me Steven Barrett (Sack Goldblatt Mitchell), Roy Adams (McMaster University / University of Saskatchewan), Lance Compa (Cornell University)

4. The Role of Financial and Economic Information and Training in Labour-Management Relations

Chair:
Claude Rioux (CRIMT)

Jean Sylvestre (Director General, Fondation de la formation économique, Fonds de solidarité FTQ), Yvan Duceppe (MCE Conseils), Michel Girard (Vice-président Opérations Usines Canadiennes, AbitibiBowater inc.), Christian Dufour (Institut de recherches économiques et sociales), Jacques Lessard (Regional Director, Quebec Region, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada)


SSHRC-MCRI Theme(s): Themes 2, 3 et 4

Promotional Material


Conference Website
Poster

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Relations industrielles / Industrial Relations (forthcoming)
Spacer(2011) C. Brunelle, G. Murray (Eds.)
Spacer
Revue de l'IRES (forthcoming)
SpacerE-Proceedings

Post-Conference Website
Media Library


  Systèmes de représentation

Table ronde 1

Table ronde 2

Table ronde 3
 
   
 
     
    16 April 2010 • Seminar

Perspectives on Quebec's Collective Agreement Decrees Regime

University of Montreal
Montreal, Canada

For over 75 years, Quebec's collective agreement decrees regime has evolved to adapt to different realities. Periodically, there are voices saying that this "anomaly" of the industrial relations system should be abolished. Others, however, highlight the need to keep the regime, and seek to improve it because of its ability to better the conditions of vulnerable workers and increase their say in the determination of their own working conditions.

On April 16, 2010, a seminar entitled Perspectives on the Quebec collective agreement decrees regime (QCADR) was held in Montreal. Organized in collaboration with Quebec’s Joint Committees Association (Association des comités paritaires du Québec, or ACPQ), this seminar aimed to present different perspectives on the QCADR, as well as to stimulate exchanges between scholars and labour market partners about its future
.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): 3.5.4

Promotional Material


Program (French only)

Deliverables

Media Library


  DCC
 
   
 
         
    29 March 2010 • International Seminar

Regulating Decent Work for Domestic Workers: International and Comparative Dialogue Celebrating the ILO at 90 & Preparing for Standard‐Setting into the Future

McGill University
Montreal, Canada

More than forty years after having recognized the urgency of a study on the working conditions of domestic workers, the International Labour Organization (ILO) is on track to adopt an international labour standard on decent work for domestic workers before the end of 2011. The ILO’s 2009 report, which seeks to provide an account of the situation and working conditions of domestic workers across the world, can be consulted Online.

Supported financially by Human Resources and Skills Development, and organized in collaboration with the Labour Law and Development Research Laboratory, this international seminar aimed to bring together social partners, including domestic workers' associations, and international and interdisciplinary researchers specialized in the field in order to encourage an intensive consultation between the various participants concerned by the issue of decent work for domestic workers. This seminar also presented an opportunity for exchange between researchers and social partners to identify the policy issues involved and to compare different regulatory approaches adopted in various countries. It also seeked to provide an opportunity for social partners to share their reflections on the presentations and their expertise in the area before the two upcoming sessions of the International Labour Conference in Geneva in June 2010 and 2011. Finally, this activity offered a chance for Canada to celebrate the 90 years since the ILO was established in 1919. To that end, a special exhibit commemorating the time during which Montreal was host to the ILO during the Second World War was presented in the Atrium of McGill University's Faculty of Law.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): 2.4.2

Promotional Material


Poster

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Canadian Journal of Women and the Law
Spacer(2011) A. Blackett (Ed.)

Post-Seminar Website
Media Library


  TDTD  
     
    2009      
           
    14 December 2009 • Round-Table

Crise économique et dialogue social

University of Montreal
Montreal, Canada


Michel Arsenault
President, Fédération des travailleurs et travailleuses du Québec
Assane Diop
Executive Director of the ILO Social Protection Sector, Geneva
Jean Charest
University of Montreal / CRIMT

Summary (French only):

Mettant en vedette Michel Arsenault (FTQ), Assane Diop (BIT) et Jean Charest (UdeM), cette table ronde visait à faire le point sur la nature et les conséquences de la crise financière sur le monde du travail au Québec et au Canada, sur le rôle du dialogue social en période de crise, sur l'avantage institutionnel lié au modèle québécois de concertation et sur l'avenir du dialogue social à l'ère du 90e anniversaire de l'Organisation internationale du travail (OIT).

Held at the University of Montreal, this round table was organized in collaboration with the School of Industrial Relations at the University of Montreal, the Fédération des travailleurs et des travailleuses du Québec (FTQ) and the Fonds de solidarité FTQ.


SSHRC-MCRI Theme(s): Theme 5

Deliverables


Media Library

   
   
 
         
    4-5 June 2009 • International Symposium

Symposium Franco-Québécois en Droit Santé Travail. Le reclassement, l'accommodement: quelles obligations pour l'employeur; quelle réalité, quel impact sur le maintien du salarié en entreprise ?

Lille Grand Palais
Lille, France

Organized under the auspices of the Université Lille 2 Droit et Santé, the Centre d'études et de recherches en Santé-Travail-Environnemen, Laval University, CRIMT and Quebec's Institut National de Santé Publique, this international symposium featured a rich program, made all the more interesting by the presence of prominent personalities whom agreed to dabate timely and important issues which have been the subject of much litigation.

More than 300 participants attended the symposium, half of whom were physicians, the other half being human resource managers, lawyers, business consultants and academics. Nurses and health secretaries also took part in the discussions.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): 3.3

Promotional Material


Symposium Website
Pedagogical File

  Sante_travail  
   
 
         
    25-26 March 2009 • International Seminar

Crisis in the Manufacturing Sector: The Canadian Experience in North American Perspective

HEC Montréal
Montreal, Canada

The manufacturing industry is in profound disarray. Plant closures, job loses, restructuring and reorganizing reflect the many difficulties to which companies, workers, and communities are confronted. This international seminar brought together academics and labour market partners to discuss the challenges posed by the crisis of the manufacturing sector in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. In addition to discussing causes and major trends, restructuring processes and their impacts on labour relations in key segments of the manufacturing sector such as the auto, aerospace, pulp and paper, and steel industries were also tackled.

This international seminar was rendered possible by the financial support of the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), Quebec's Ministère du Développement économique, de l'Innovation et de l'Exportation, the Fonds de solidarité de la FTQ and the Fonds de recherche sur la société et la culture (FQRSC).


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): 1.2

Promotional Material


Leaflet
Program
Poster

  CSM  
     
    2008  
       
    19 June 2008 • International Seminar

Human Resource Practices in Multinational Companies (MNCs)

Croke Park Conference Centre
Dublin, Ireland

This particular seminar was the second in a series aimed at bringing together CRIMT coresearchers (part of the INTREPID Network and of subproject 1.1) and business and labour leaders concerned with the redeployment of multinational companies. In this case from the Republic of Ireland.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): 1.1

Promotional Material


Seminar Website

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Reports 1, 2, 3 - Irish Survey

  Limerick  
     
    2007      
           
    8 November 2007 • Colloquium

Rapports hiérarchiques ou anarchiques des règles de droit : chartes, normes d'ordre public, convention collective, contrat de travail, etc.

Université Laval
Quebec, Canada

Summary (French only):

Le droit de l’emploi connaît des perturbations provoquées par certains arrêts de la Cour suprême du Canada. Ces avancées judiciaires témoignent d’un malaise à bien saisir les nécessaires interrelations des chartes des droits, des lois de l’emploi, de la convention collective et du contrat de travail.

Pour de multiples facteurs épistémologiques, le droit de l’emploi procède de diverses sources juridiques : constitutionnelle, législative, réglementaire, conventionnelle, contractuelle, jurisprudentielle, etc. Conformément à la morphologie générale du droit, les conditions de travail résultent de la loi, de la convention collective et du contrat. Selon une conjugaison plus ou moins complexe des règles de droit provenant de ces sources, un régime de relations de travail s’impose à la fois à l’employeur et au salarié.

Depuis 1925, et d’une façon toujours plus directe et plus précise, l’État établit des normes fondamentales et minimales relatives aux conditions de travail des salariés. Sauf indication expresse à l’effet contraire, ces règles de droit s’imposent à toute personne liée par contrat de travail. Elles constituent un seuil en-deçà duquel la liberté contractuelle des parties au contrat de travail ou à la convention collective ne peut être valablement exercée. À titre d’illustration, la Loi sur les normes du travail (L.n.t.) consacre le caractère d’ordre public des normes en précisant que le contrat individuel de travail et la convention collective ne peuvent y déroger (art. 93 L.n.t.), sauf de manière plus favorable (art. 94 L.n.t.). Plusieurs autres lois telles la Loi sur la santé et la sécurité du travail ou la Loi sur les accidents du travail et les maladies professionnelles, viennent de la même manière ajouter au contenu obligatoire des actes aménageant les relations de travail.

Depuis 1994, le Code civil du Québec (C.c.Q.) inclut le contrat de travail au titre des contrats nommés (art. 2085 à 2097) en lieu et place des quelques dispositions relatives à la « location de services personnels » antérieurement applicables sous l’empire du C.c.B.C. La définition du contrat de travail (art. 2085 C.c.Q.) englobe, sans exception, toute forme de relation de travail « subordonné » et c’est pourquoi elle doit prendre place dans l’ensemble du système de régulation de ces relations interpersonnelles, comme le précise clairement la « disposition préliminaire » du même Code civil.

S’ajoutent à cette trame de protections, les conventions collectives librement négociées dans le cadre spécifique du Code du travail. Ce régime collectif, constitué initialement en 1944, repose sur le constat que des salariés peuvent ne pas être en état d’exercer individuellement leur liberté contractuelle puisqu’ils conviennent de le faire ensemble, c’est-à-dire collectivement et par le truchement de leur syndicat. Les trois piliers suivants caractérisent ce régime axé sur « l’autonomie collective » :

i) Le droit des salariés de disposer d’un représentant exclusif choisi à la majorité par un groupe de salariés donné ; dès lors, obligation est faite aux parties de négocier de bonne foi une convention collective déterminant les conditions de travail.

ii) La convention collective qui résulte de la négociation lie l’ensemble du groupe de salariés visé de telle manière que ni l’employeur ni aucun de ces salariés ne peuvent convenir de modalités qui contreviendraient à l’entente collective. Ces conditions de travail négociées s’imposent donc à moins qu’elles ne dérogent à « l’ordre public » ou ne soient « prohibées par la loi » (art. 62 C.t.).

iii) L’arbitre de grief agit comme seul juge compétent à l’égard de tout litige découlant de l’administration, l’application et l’interprétation de la convention collective.

Soulignons aussi rétrospectivement que l’adoption en 1975 de la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne (la « Charte ») a révélé la montée en puissance, avec une intensité accrue au cours des dernières années, de divers droits individuels et plus particulièrement du droit à l’égalité. En prohibant la discrimination dans l’emploi, notamment celle fondée sur un handicap, la Charte impose à l’employeur et au syndicat accrédité la mise en oeuvre de mesures d’accommodement raisonnables prises en faveur du salarié. Cette obligation à valeur constitutionnelle s’impose donc aux parties et transcende la convention collective et le contrat individuel de travail. L’impact juridique d’autres droits fondamentaux tels que le droit à la vie privée, la liberté d’expression et la liberté d’association, est également fortement perceptible dans les rapports de travail.

Cette construction juridique étagée, laquelle caractérise le droit de l’emploi, semble ébranler les conceptions ou perceptions de certains juges qui, à quelques occasions, ont tenté d’articuler un ordre hiérarchique des normes provenant de ces différentes sources : chartes, lois, conventions collective, contrats de travail. Ce même malaise, révélé dès 1959 dans l’arrêt Paquet, a connu depuis divers rebonds, la Cour suprême du Canada ayant pris au cours des dernières années des positions susceptibles de moduler fort différemment l’aménagement ainsi que la gestion des relations de travail. Il s’agit notamment de ces cinq arrêts :

i) Dans l’arrêt Parry Sound, rendu en 2003, la Cour suprême est venue préciser que les droits et obligations d’ordre public prévus dans les chartes des droits de la personne et les lois sur l’emploi sont enchâssés implicitement dans toute convention collective. En l’espèce, malgré le fait qu’une salariée en période de probation n’avait pas droit au grief selon les termes explicites de la convention collective, on a reconnu que l’arbitre avait compétence pour sanctionner une violation de ses droits fondamentaux.

ii) En 2004, la Cour suprême (arrêt Morin) juge que l’arbitre de grief ne dispose pas d’une compétence exclusive pour évaluer le caractère discriminatoire d’une disposition de la convention collective au regard de la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne. Cette question ne relevant ni de l’interprétation, ni de l’administration de la convention collective, mais plutôt, selon la Cour, de sa « formation » ou de sa « validité », il en résulte une compétence « concurrente » que peuvent se partager le Tribunal des droits de la personne et l’arbitre de grief.

iii) En 2006, la Cour suprême (arrêt Isidore Garon) précise que seules les normes d’ordre public jugées « compatibles » avec la convention collective y seraient intégrées implicitement. Ainsi, en cas de silence de cette dernière, les dispositions du Code civil du Québec qui confèrent au salarié le droit à un délai de congé raisonnable, sans possibilité d’y renoncer, ne peuvent être « incorporées » à la convention collective parce que de telles normes, juge-t-on, sont « incompatibles avec le régime collectif de travail ». L’arbitre de grief ne peut donc statuer sur les indemnités de délai de congé (art. 2091 C.c.Q.) réclamées par un syndicat au nom des salariés licenciés à la suite de la fermeture d’une entreprise.

iv) Toujours en 2006, la Cour suprême (arrêt Université Concordia) élargit et assouplit l’aire de compétence de l’arbitre de grief de manière à ce qu’il puisse se saisir des questions rapprochées ou collatérales du grief qui l’occupe (théorie du « comptoir unique »). En l’occurrence, il s’agissait d’un litige portant sur l’administration et l’utilisation par l’employeur de la caisse du régime de retraite auxquelles renvoie explicitement la convention collective. Le recours collectif ainsi intenté par un salarié compris dans l’unité de négociation couvert par l’accréditation était, de ce fait, « incompatible » avec le monopole de représentation détenu par le syndicat accrédité et le postulat de la compétence exclusive de l’arbitre de grief.

v) En 2007, la Cour suprême (arrêt Centre universitaire de santé McGill) réaffirme la préséance des droits quasi constitutionnels du salarié, en confirmant le droit pour un salarié handicapé de bénéficier d’un accommodement individualisé malgré les dispositions claires de la convention collective autorisant la rupture du lien d’emploi à l’expiration d’un délai prédéterminé d’absence continue. La Cour précise toutefois que la clause négociée par les parties constitue un « élément important » dans l’appréciation par le tribunal de l’accommodement raisonnable, de sorte qu’il appartiendrait au salarié ou au syndicat accrédité de démontrer qu’une mesure additionnelle à celle négociée par les parties doit être imposée
.

These five decisions alone provided ample material for debate. More than half of the 220 participants who took part in this seminar were labour lawyers.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): n/a

Promotional Material


Program
Poster

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Proceedings / Table of Contents
Spacer(2008) D. Roux & A.-M. Laflamme (Eds.), Wilson & Lafleur

  Hierarchie  
         
    2006      
           
    20-21 September 2006 • International Seminar

Human Resource Management in Multinational Companies: International Seminar on Global Value Chains, Employment Practices and Public Policy

HEC Montréal
Montreal, Canada

The world economy is experiencing tremendous change. Systems of production and distribution are being relocated between and within global regions, bringing new opportunities to enhance standards of living as well as economic and social dislocation on an epochal scale. Multinational companies (MNCs) are at the heart of the movement of capital, productive capacity and know-how and jobs across borders and within international supply chains. Scarcely a day goes by when the news is not about human resource (HR) and employment issues: the capacity to innovate and the transfer of innovations across borders, productivity gaps between Canada and its major competitors, the acquisition of Canadian firms by foreign capital and the impact of such sales on the development of the Canadian economy, skills and skills shortages, the consequences of an appreciating Canadian dollar, the relevance of subsidies and other benefits to induce firms to locate their activities in Canada, the outsourcing and the offshoring of jobs, and putative tradeoffs between labour flexibility and worker well-being.

What are the key HR trends in multinational firms in Canada? How do HR and employment considerations affect decisions to expand or retract activities in Canada? Are the Canadian operations of MNCs innovators or adapters, i.e. are they developing new practices and diffusing them in other parts of their global operations or are they simply implementing, in a Canadian context, what is being driven from the headquarters of their worldwide company and being done elsewhere in their firm? And how do MNC managers view the policy and HR environments in Canada and to what extent do these environments impact on decisions made by their worldwide company?

This particular seminar was the first in a series aimed at bringing together CRIMT coresearchers (part of the INTREPID Network and of subproject 1.1) and business and labour leaders concerned with the redeployment of multinational companies. In this case from the Canada. This seminar was organized in collaboration with the Canada Project of the Conference Board of Canada.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): n/a

Promotional Material


Seminar Website
Poster

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Report - Canadian Survey

  MNCs  
   
 
           
    9-11 February 2006 • International Conference

Global Companies - Global Unions / Global Research - Global Campaigns

Crown Plaza Hotel
New-York City, USA

Unions around the globe continue to operate in an ever-more complex and rapidly changing corporate environment. Increasingly the employers they face across the bargaining table or in organizing campaigns are part of diffuse transnational companies who have no loyalty to any one industry, product, or country. Given the globalization of firms, finance, and labor markets, the labor movement recognizes that union organizing and bargaining campaigns and strategic research must become global as well.

With these challenges in mind, the School of Industrial and Labor Relations (Cornell University), CRIMT and a host of university and labour market partners joined efforts
to organized this conference which was attended by 550 trade unionists and university researchers.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): n/a

Promotional Material


Conference Website
Poster

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Global Unions
Spacer(2007) K. Bronfenbrenner (Ed.), Cornell University Press

  Global  
         
    2004      
           
    19 November 2004 • International Conference

Forum on Union Renewal: Innovations for Union Power in a Globalized Economy

HEC Montréal
Montreal, Canada

Regardless of the workplace, country or continent, unions are facing the same refrain: globalization, flexiblization, deregulation, liberalization, privatization, individualization and so on. Traditional forms of action are being questioned, past gains have to be renegotiated, and it is difficult for workers to make themselves heard. How should unions respond to these new challenges? What kinds of innovation should they explore and what paths of renewal should they favour?

Aside from the scientific plenaries and workshops organized in the context of the conference, a forum (held on November 19th 2004) allowed for more than 220 trade unionists and university researchers to debate the many challenges associated with current attempts at union renewal.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): n/a

Promotional Material

Conference Website
Poster

Deliverables

Publication(s) : Just Labour, 6&7
Spacer(2005) L. Haiven, S. LeQueux, C. Lévesque, G. Murray
SpacerTransfer, Vol.11, No.4
Spacer(2005) G. Murray, J. Waddington
SpacerPaths to Union Renewal: Canadian Experiences
Spacer(2005) P. Kumar, C. Schenk
SpacerLabor Studies Journal, Vol.31, No.3
Spacer(2006) C. Lévesque, G. Murray
SpacerRelations industrielles / Indusrial Relations, Vol.61, No.4
Spacer(2006) L. Haiven, C. Lévesque, N. Roby
Spacer
Post-Conference Website


  Union Renewal  
         
    2003      
           
    21 November 2003 • Round-Table

Facts and Ill-Effects of Sub-Contracting: The Case of Quebec

Patrice Jalette
University of Montreal, Canada / CRIMT

Round-table targeted at labour market partners, organized in collaboration with Quebec's Ordre des conseillers en ressources humaines et en relations industrielles agréés.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): n/a

  Jalette  
   
 
           
    27 October 2003 • Round-Table

The Construction Industry in Europe and Quebec: What's at Stake?

Gerhard Bosch
Institut Arbeit und Qualifikation, Germany / CRIMT

This round-table provided for an exchange between Prof. Gerhard Bosch - CRIMT coresearcher and renowned specialist of the european construction industry - and several key actors of Quebec's construction sector. It was organized in collaboration with Quebec's Commission de la construction and chaired by Jean Charest, CRIMT coresearcher and Director of the University of Montreal's School of Industrial Relations.


SSHRC-MCRI Subproject(s): n/a

  Bosch  
           
           
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